How To Choose The Right Wedding Photographer

Choosing the right wedding photographer can seem like a daunting task, but it doesn’t have to be if you ask the right questions to get the best fit for you.

We spoke with Toronto based wedding photographer Ian Liwanag from Photo & Co. to get his perspective on what couples should be asking, in order to choose the right photographer that will give them a lifetime of memories to cherish.

How long have you been a wedding photographer?
Experience speaks volumes, but what should be of real value is the photographers ability to manage potentially stressful situations. You need a connection with your photographer that allows you to feel comfortable and trusting, so make sure you enjoy being around each other and you trust them to capture your special day. It’s very important to have a mutual understanding of expectations.

How many hours do we have you for or do you provide special packages?
It’s always best to let the photographer know exactly what your needs and expectations are. Some of my clients ask me to capture their whole story from start to finish, from getting ready, to the ceremony, to the venue itself, with all the flowers and decor and of course dancing. While other clients simply want basic coverage of their ceremony with family and friends. 

Can we see your portfolio of past work?
Every professional photographer has a different eye, their work is very subjective and you need to look at their work to determine if their creative approach matches your artistic integrity. It doesn’t matter how recommended they are to you, if your not loving their style you wont love your photos.

Are the photos edited for touch ups?
Basic colour correction like taking care of brightness, contrast, levelling photos should all be included in the post edit. 

How long will it take to get our images back?
An acceptable turn around time is typically 2 months.

A professional photographer will be able to cover all the technical aspects of your wedding day photography, i.e. lighting issues, composition of your photos, attention to detail, there is no “do over” on your wedding day, it’s always best to hire a professional photographer and not “Uncle Bob”.



Wedding Etiquette In The Age Of Social Media

Social media remains an integral part of daily life for younger generations. For couples who grew up in the age of popular social sharing sites like Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, bringing the online world into their wedding planning is a natural reaction to their constant social media connectivity. When small events in the day are worthy of an update, a milestone as large as a wedding serves as the magnum opus of social media relevancy.

Social sharing and wedding planning, however, don’t always mix well. Wedding planning and the details of the big day often remain subject to certain rules of etiquette. The rules become blurred when sharing online, but there still remains a proper protocol especially as it replies to taking the wedding into the social media realm.

There are lines online that should not and cannot be crossed via social media. While many rules apply to the wedding party, guests are subject to their own set of social guidelines. There are rules of conduct that must not be breached online or in person, and then there are guidelines that apply only to the social media realm.

Follow these simple rules of etiquette when incorporating social media into wedding planning:

For the Bride & Groom:

Request permission from professional photographers before posting any professional pictures online. Most photographers own the copyrights to their photos. Respect the copyright.

Do not share details about wedding registries via social media. Etiquette dictates that word of mouth is the best way to share registry details. Guests should inquire about registries, they should not be told.

Like gift registries, money requests in lieu of gifts should not be promoted via social media. Word of mouth, again, is the proper method to ensure guests know that gifts of cash would be preferred. Also, do not promote sites that solicit funds for a Honeymoon through any social media platform. Links to such sites may be listed on a wedding web site instead.

 

Thank you notes should be hand written, not emailed.

If guests are encouraged to snap shots of the ceremony, set up an online photo sharing site where all snapshots may be uploaded. Candid shots by guests capture the best memories…be sure to save them.

 For the Wedding Party:

Bridesmaids and groomsmen should not post wedding day selfies or pictures online without consent of the bride and/or groom. Imagine the bride’s dress being photographed and posted online before walking down the aisle…and having the groom see it on social media first. All members of the wedding party should discuss any picture posting rules before the wedding date.

 

Posting pictures of debauchery at bachelor and/or bachelorette parties are unnecessary and embarrassing. They might even cost someone a job. Think twice before posting any questionable photographs…no matter how humorous.

Sending updates on the wedding day about any wedding mishap. Small details that go awry can lead into huge meltdowns. Don’t post anything about problems…no matter how miniscule.

Refrain from posting updates about the wedding details. Again, all details should be shared only by the bride and/or groom.

For Guests:

Check with the wedding hosts to inquire about snapping photos during the ceremony or the reception. Some couples prefer that guests not take photos.

Do not request the bride and/or groom to pose for photos. The day is long and overwhelming for them. Respect the boundaries.

Like the wedding party, guests should not upload photos or post any updates regarding wedding details, preparations, etc. Some details should remain private.

Unsure where the couple is registered? Ask! Word of mouth is the best way to find out about registries. Also inquire about a wedding web site, which usually has a host of other information for guests.

Turn off or silence phones during the ceremony and the reception.

Social media has provided a new avenue to share wedding photos, special details and other memories from the ceremony and the reception. However, there are rules and proper etiquette to follow when incorporating social media into wedding planning. Remember: just because something can be posted online, doesn’t mean it SHOULD be posted online…otherwise, the something blue might just be the entire mood of the wedding day.

 



Not Your Typical Wedding

Helen Pispidikis from Weddings by Design has been planning Weddings and Events for over 15 years. Many trends have come and gone but says Helen “the key to creating a unique and memorable wedding celebration is to make the trend your own”.

As an Event Designer, her goal is to fuse the personalities of today’s couples, with inspiration from the latest trends in colours and fashion / design to create a unique and memorable experience for all to remember. “A wedding is a chance for each couple to create a celebration they’ve always dreamed of — the story of who they are as a couple representing their personal taste and style. Elements of design are than added to the mix to bring the event to life in its own unique way.”

The wedding featured in this article illustrates how current trends in fashion, colour and floral design can be adapted to create a very organic and eclectic approach to wedding design. “In 2016 floral trends are more organic rather than structured. The trending colours for 2016 are Rose Quartz and Serenity Blue. In fashion we are seeing a lot of large floral prints. When we merge all the above with the couples personality and the look and feel of their venue — magic happens! Love is in the details and no details should be overlooked”.

“The floral inspiration in this wedding design was the Tulip which was used in the floral arrangements throughout the space.  However, taking our inspiration from the large floral prints in the 2016 Dolce Gabbana Spring Collection, we decided to create drama in the space by translating the tulip motif on the Dance Floor, with a custom vinyl floor — this was the WOW factor in the space.”

In this above photo the dresses on the left are from the Dolce Gabbana Spring 2016 Fashion collection, you can see where the design was translated onto the dance floor.

There are many ways to incorporate colour and interest into the design of a space. “Design elements can include cutlery, glassware, charger plates or even dessert plates — small items can make a big statement.”

The floor plan and the use of different size and shape of tables along with the use of coordinating linens and florals all play a role in creating a unique and interesting event space.

“Don’t be afraid of mixing things up. In this space the floor plan incorporated square and round tables. The round tables featured coordinating linens and napkins in Serenity Blue and black, with two styles of centrepieces — a mixed organic floral arrangement on some tables, alternating with tall candles with garlands and a deconstructed floral design on others. The rectangular tables featured a garland of greens accented by tall candles at different heights and clusters of florals in different vessels. The black tulip overlays were used to match the black wrought iron chandeliers and wall sconces in the event space.”

Let’s not forget the cake!!! “Wedding cakes have come a long way and today they are not only one of the design elements in a wedding but a work of art. Hand painted florals and designs on weddings are a big trend in 2016.”

From start to finish your wedding theme should be reflected in every element of the design. “Your invitations are the first impression of what is to come. Stationary at the event including menus, table numbers and seating charts all play a role in the design and theme of a wedding.”

For inspirational ideas and creativity a Wedding Designer can help plan a memorable wedding that reflects your style.  #weddingsbydesign



Old Mill Toronto Wedding Open House

This past Tuesday, the Old Mill Toronto held a Wedding Open House with a host of top vendors on hand. The gorgeous space is a picturesque hotel and spa that features 57 well appointed rooms and suites. Attending guests were awe-struck by the opulent beauty of each of the decorated rooms. Thankfully, Ian Liwanag was on hand to capture the timeless details.

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We love that each room had a luxe vibe that complemented the ornate furnishings found all over the venue. The beautiful linens in each room were provided by Chair Decor, the in-house linen team. We love that the Old Mill provided organized tours of the venue so that attending couples were able to experience the array of venue options available for their wedding. Each tour was conducted by an experienced coordinator who was able to spend one-on-one time with each couple, answering questions and finding rooms that worked best for their wedding vision.

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We love the simple backdrop and glitzy rose-gold linens of the head table pictured above. Our friends at Patricia’s Cake Creations displayed their intricately designed cakes in each room and provided yummy samples to attending guests.

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iceFX created several intricate ice sculptures and luges that proved to be a crowd favourite. Ice luges are always a hit at events – who doesn’t love a delicious cold drink that comes with a show?

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Our friends at Snapz Photobooth had a great traditional photobooth set up and provided fun keepsakes for attendees.

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The Old Mill Toronto is almost fully booked for 2016, so act fast if you want to be married at this gorgeous venue this year! We saw many couples meeting with coordinators to finalize their details, and everyone walked away with big smiles. Congratulations on a fantastic open house!

By Alisha Chadee



How To Choose Your Wedding Venue

 

Choosing the best venue for your wedding is important, and it may seem like a task consisting only of liking a space or not, but in reality there is way more to consider than that. Since the number of wedding venue options are infinite now, there are many important questions couples need to consider before booking their venue.  It’s always a great idea to be prepared with your questions and priorities and keep track of all your top points on a spreadsheet, allowing you to keep track of each venues suitability as you do your research.

Having a rough idea of your “wedding size”, whether you will invite 60,125 or 300 guests, will narrow down the venues on your list that don’t have the capacity to fit your estimated guest list. It is also a good idea to have your budget in mind, no sense in keeping a $12,000 venue on your list when you can really only afford $4,000.

Things you should consider;

Is this venue available on the date that I want? 
Do you have a specific day or month in mind? Always a good idea to double-check availability at the site visit.

Does this venue’s space fit my needs? 
If you want your ceremony, cocktails, and reception all in one venue, does the space your considering have separate spaces for all of those events?  Does it require a space that is weather dependent, such as an outdoor space?  It’s also important to talk through the flow of the ceremony if you’re having one there and pay attention to the little details, like routes your guests will take, what the bathrooms are like, whether they have heating/air conditioning and where the power sockets are for your entertainment and speeches. 

Is the catering in-house or is there an approved caterers list?
Are there any sample menus you can look at and do they provide menu tastings? What type of menu service is provided, for example, plated, buffet, french service, food stations etc.

Location, Location, Location…
Will you have to provide transportation for guests from a hotel to your venue or do they have onsite accommodation for your guests? How easy is it to access by public transport? If everyone is driving, is there ample parking. 

How does the pricing structure work?
Is it based on room rental, price per head, minimum spend or are there set packages?  What are your bar options, can you supply your own beverages and will there be a corkage charge? Are there any extra rental charges for tables, chairs linen and flatware?  

What Kind of Venue are you looking for?
Consider whether you want a traditional or non-traditional venue. Are you looking for rustic, formal, romantic, elegant, relaxed, historical, the wedding style you envision will help determine your venue options. Hotels, Golf Clubs, Beaches, Vineyards, Formal Gardens, there are plenty of venues that regularly play host to weddings, even barns and galleries! Keep in mind if you opt for a totally non-traditional venue that’s not equipped to host a party, you’ll be responsible for a lot more details so make sure they are in your budget. You should also consider the decor of the venue, is the venue naturally beautiful and impressive or is it a blank slate that will need additional decor and pizzaz to warm it up?

Few Ceremony and reception venues compare with the casual elegance and timeless style of the Old Mill Toronto to help you realize your dream wedding. Our on site 16th century candlelit chapel and out door wedding garden add to the array of personal choices. 

Join us on Tuesday February 23rd for the Old Mill Toronto Wedding Open House. Meet our preferred venders, view our beautiful venue, enjoy complimentary hors d’ oeuvres and beverages and enter to win a weekend getaway. 



Fifty Shades of White

It was the Ragtime era, when the phonograph became available to consumers. The first time guests were dancing at weddings; and in spite of high waists and high collars, long trains and long gloves it was the bopping head and flailing arms and legs of the Turkey Trot that was coveted by the youth and considered scandalous by polite society.

In 1914; the start of World War I the Toronto cityscape was dotted with horse and buggies as the population pushed 200,000. It was the year of the opening of the Old Mill Tea Room, the future venue for a legacy of weddings that would define the iconic Toronto landmark.

In 1929 the Old Mill Tea Room added a dance hall; and a nine piece orchestra that played six nights a week. It was the Depression so although couples continued to exchange vows brides were exchanging silk for rayon gowns or their Sunday dresses that could be worn again.

In the thirties with women supplying ¼ of Toronto’s workforce the world was introduced to mac ‘n cheese, instant oatmeal and canned soup varieties. The invention of kettles that whistled when they boiled and blenders for home use made it easier for women to go to work.

Amid World War II even more women were employed and weddings were planned with haste to young men in the forces. Vogue magazine wrote (1942) “Weddings nowadays hang not on the brides’ whim, but on the decision of the grooms’ commanding officer.”

Grooms were increasingly wearing wedding bands as visual reminders of their nuptials.

This era of rationing and practicality forced shorter hemlines (above the ankle for bike-riding ease) and lacy sweaters to get the most mileage out of a ball of wool. Brides were not exempt from frugality often using furnishing fabrics and lace curtains to fashion their wedding attire.

Life was better in the fifties. Toronto got a television broadcast system, TV dinners were on grocery shelves and portable dishwashers were being wheeled into kitchens.

Brides were wearing ballerina-length dresses with luxurious poufy layers and short fingerless gloves made of lace. Bolero jackets were in demand for ceremonies, covering strapless or laced dresses with sweetheart collars for the reception.

In the sixties women were making up 1/3 of the Canadian workforce and ¼ of the Canadian engineering profession. They were learning that ovens could (and should) clean themselves.

When they were grooving down the aisle brides were choosing short skirts or dresses and hair worn long, dotted with flowers or veils popping from pill box hats.

Toronto enjoyed architectural successes in the seventies, with Ontario Place, The Eaton Centre and The CN Tower being erected. Microwave ovens hit the Canadian market but the decade is generally associated with flower power and the peace movement.

Blame it on the hippies, but seventies brides had their own fashion senses. From pantsuits to smocked gauze gowns to Bohemian frocks this was an era of recreational duds.

O Canada became the official national anthem in 1980 kicking off an era of formality and tradition in wedding styles.

If one person can define the decade it was Diana, Princess of Wales who set the tone for puffy hair, puffy sleeves, long-distance trains and veils and the return to bodacious bouquets. Brides among the non-nobles dressed as princesses nonetheless.

The nineties were digital; as in cameras, answering machines and video discs. People were still using coin booth telephones but mobile phones were introduced to the marketplace.

In fashion, the ‘designer look’ was desirable. Brides were wearing strapless, sleeveless and sexy gowns. Cleavage was in (or out?) and dresses were form fitting.

At the turn of the century the vowels were ahead; with the arrival of iPhones, e-tickets, e-books, USBs and ATMs.

Drinks are frothy and wedding gowns more so. Pick-up skirts and asymmetrical hems fall from form fitting bodices.

Mermaids may be mystical in the sea but on the aisle the Mermaid dress is genuine and sought after, as is the Pandora, Princess, Sabrina or Tulip dress.

A century of changing styles, fashions and trends; yet the Old Mill Toronto is unwavering in their dedication to their brides and their special days.

You might say that the Old Mill Toronto, Toronto’s most romantic wedding venue, will go to great lengths to seek perfection.



Wedding Candy Bar Inspiration!

Here’s the scoop, pulling off a beautiful dessert or candy bar display isn’t as easy as it looks, but the end result can be visually stunning as well as yummy! Every Candy Bar should be unique and an expression of your own personality.

It is important to keep your candy bar cohesive with a theme or color scheme. To be visually captivating, you could choose a colour scheme that matches your wedding palette. Taking advantage of the colors you’ve already established for your wedding can enhance your candy bar’s presence.

You can add depth and height in your display with simple boxes, creating a beautiful landscape on your candy bar.  You can wrap the boxes in decorative paper, or cover with matching linens for a refined, free-flowing look.

Consider where your candy bar will be located.  Will there be a nice backdrop or wall behind it for pictures?  Will it be open so people can access it from all sides, or will it be round?  Melting can be an issue in warmer seasons, so  keep your candy table in air conditioning or choose candies that won’t melt by the end of the night.

Now on to the good stuff CANDY:

Try to stock at least 1/4 -1/2 lbs of candy per guest. As long as you have a mix of flavours and treats, anything goes. Remember colour is key and having a specific colour scheme can really make your table pop. Make sure to consider different hues and shades of your main colour scheme. Monochromatic palettes can also be striking and elegant. 

Try to be creative by bundling lollipops together like a bouquet of flowers, or skewer some candies to simulate kabobs – the possibilities are endless. Remember to keep it simple, having a variety of flavours and different types of candy can be satisfying to everyone, but don’t be afraid to go with a specific flavour profile.  Whether it be a sour candy bar or a chocolate truffle tribute, your guests will definitely enjoy the sugar rush! Oh, and a candy bar doesn’t have to be just candy, consider mini cookies, mini cupcakes and coloured kettle corn.  

Don’t forget about guest allergies, you should either leave those candies off the table or make sure they’re clearly marked. The time of season can also dictate the type of candy you select—for example, cinnamon and pumpkin treats work for fall while tart lemon and citrus candies are perfect for summer.    

Final rule; there are no rules, the sky is the limit, so have fun with your selection and theme, and remember sometimes less is more.



Romantic Winter Weddings

While winter is not the most popular season for weddings, we are seeing more couples create a romantic wedding during the starkness of winter. A winter wedding can be truly spectacular. Bright colours and twinkling lights add a cozy warmth, that can not be captured the same way at a summer wedding.

Keep in mind, when choosing a winter wedding location, the indoor space should be warm and inviting, making your guests feel at home. Wood-burning fireplaces and rooms with windows, so you can see the soft fall of snowflakes outside, and, the sun flooding your room with natural light adds a cozy warmth to your winter wedding. It is also a good idea to select a wedding venue that can accommodate everything you need in one location; ceremony, reception and overnight accommodations for your guests.

The ambience around a winter wedding is similar to the first snowfall of the season, it’s magical and very romantic. Make sure to highlight and maximize the winter elements in your decor; faux snow and Christmas twinkle lights add to a perfect winter wedding wonderland, incorporate this with natural components, such as frosted pinecones, pine leaves and snowflakes. 

A romantic winter wedding provides the perfect opportunity to serve wintry comfort foods. Try hearty dishes, like pasta, lasagna, a roast, casseroles, classic filet mignon, hearty greens and warm soups. Also, be fun and creative with the dessert course and set up a hot chocolate bar or s’mores bar. Serve creamy eggnog cocktails and spicy mulled wines, it’s a sweet and stylish way to celebrate the season.

There’s a new take on self-service candy bars that’s perfect for trendy winter weddings: an all-white candy spread. Think white M&Ms, yogurt-covered pretzels, white chocolate-covered cranberries, white-coated chocolate mints, nonpareils covered in white sprinkles, and various white Jelly Belly flavours. Self service candy bars can serve as both dessert and party favours.

Have a look at some winter wedding inspirations on pinterest.

Don forget to have fun creating a winter-themed wedding invitation. You can play up the uniqueness of your chosen wedding date by including snowy scenes, holiday themes, snowflakes or cozy fireside tableaux.

And, when it’s time to shop for your wedding dress begin your search by browsing dress photos online. Read up on silhouettes, necklines, trains and hues that might flatter you. The season will also affect your choice of material, brocade, faux fur and velvet will keep you warm in the winter, but, satin, shantung, silk and tulle are perfect year-round.

The entire wedding, from ceremony to reception, is guaranteed to make an impression in the memories of all your guests simply because it’s different from all of the spring and summer weddings they typically attend. Plus, your wedding will provide something to look forward to in the colder months.

Few Toronto wedding venues compare with the casual elegance and timeless style of our unique Old Mill Toronto, creating an unrivalled location for your special Wedding day.



What to give for a Wedding Gift

It’s that age-old question we all come across at some point, “How much do we give?” “Do we buy a gift?” “What do we get?, they have everything!”…

Figuring out how much to spend and what type of gift to give can be stressful, particularly if your generosity exceeds your budget.

First rule of thumb is to check if they have registered with a store. 98% of brides have at least one registry. These days, couples are statistically older and more established in their lives so when they register, they are truly asking for things that they need.

If items listed on the registry aren’t within your price range, consider giving a gift card to the store where the registry is listed. Think creatively if you can’t spend a lot of money, it’s not about the dollar amount you spend, it is the thought that counts most. They’re probably more concerned you can show up for their big day than they are with some pricey gift anyway. Small and simple things can have the most impact or value when linked to the day and couple, such as an engraved picture frame or other unique and creative wedding gifts.

If the couple registered for a big-ticket item that’s a little to much for one person to afford, why not consider a group gift. Couples love group gifts because they most likely can’t afford those luxuries on their own. Also consider a theme idea, with multiple gifts, or an overnight mini staycation with dinner or spa.

Wedding experts agree on a couple of things: the closer you are to the bride or groom, the more you are expected to give, and do not give more than you can afford just because of the expectations. It’s a bad idea to use the price-per-plate as a measure for how much you should spend on the wedding gift, the location and cost of the reception should not be the burden of the guest.

Give what ever you think is appropriate to your budget and your relationship with the couple but a ballpark guide would be… A distant relative or co-worker, $75-$100; a friend or relative, $100-$125; a closer relative, up to $150.

With regards to the Plus-One Status, you don’t need to double the amount if you’re double the guests, but you should multiply your base number by 1.5. (So if you generally don’t go lower than $100 when you’re solo, don’t go lower than $150 if you have a plus-one.)

You should never feel bad if travel costs impact your gift budget. If you’re spending money on travel and hotel to be there on their day, that is a huge contribution already. It is more important that you give within your means.

Whatever you decide to give, do so with thoughtfulness and affection, because you were invited to a special event where your presence is considered important.



Wedding Decor Trends

Congratulations you got engaged, now on to the good stuff! 

Couples are keen on infusing their ceremonies and receptions with personality — their own. And while you want your guests to have lots of fun, you still want your wedding to be elegant and romantic no matter how grand or intimate the affair.  The decor or theme of your wedding should reflect who you are as a couple, achieving an overall personal and unique feel based on your tastes. Your individuality will come together in the details.  

The reception sets the scene, it’s when families meet and the atmosphere begins. In fact, the atmosphere set at the reception will continue for the rest of the day. Hungry guests never equate to a happy atmosphere, so it’s a good idea to serve hot and cold canapés, choosing from a wide selection of items, with high visual impact and lip smacking taste. 

 The top three trends for wedding decor…  

Vintage - this Victorian influx of stylish details brings to mind afternoon tea and garden parties (think Downton Abbey). For this look, dining al fresco is a popular choice. Tables are often left uncovered or simply adorned with a vintage lace cloth. Lush garlands get turned into runners and loosely styled floral centerpieces hang from above.  The standard Victorian flower is the rose, but other flowers such as pansies, hyacinths, tulips, and stephanotis evoke similar romantic emotions. Think chandeliers, vintage plates, white-wash vintage vanities.  Look on pinterest for some Romantic Vintage Table Settings.

Modern luxe - At the opposite corner of the inspiration board is a more sophisticated interpretation of romance. Brides who covet sleek style will gravitate toward clean color palettes with bolder accents. Think varying shades of white or ivory with a burst of poppy red, or black-and-white with a punch of emerald green. Modern doesn’t have to mean minimalistic.  Square dining tables, clear “ghost” chairs, geometric place settings, monogrammed napkins and sculptured floral arrangements help set a sophisticated tone for the evening.

Eclectic elegance - Falling somewhere between the above interpretations of romance is a resurgence of the grand wedding. “Many 2015 weddings, saw the return to classic elegance,” says Allyson Levine of Bob Gail Special Events in Los Angeles. That means formal tablescapes, butler service, candelabras and other soft lighting, dramatic cakes, lavish fabrics and formal floral arrangements. The eclectic element comes into play when couples choose to take their formal affair outside for a twilight party; opt for a gilded evening with lots of glittering blush-gold touches; replace centerpieces with champagne towers; or surprise guests with a midnight arrival of an ice-cream truck parked curbside.

Couples are rewriting the predictable pattern of a “traditional” wedding day, shunning routine for the chance to throw in unexpected elements designed to stop everyone in their tracks and create a memorable moment. Food wise this means weird yet wonderful flavour combinations (coffee-rubbed meats), live-action food theatre (oyster shucking stations), lavish self-service bars (jugs of fruit purees and magnums of Champagne) and show stopping canapé platters (with their own lighting). 

Sweet treats as a parting gesture – just when your guests turn to leave they are presented with something wonderful to eat on their way out. A cup of warm milk with a cookie, a shot of espresso and some Turkish delight, hot chocolate with mint marshmallows, a sweet treat from the late-night candy bar… Proof that you’ve thought of them right to the last moment!

Our wedding planners offer you personalized service to guide you in making the planning of your most important day as simple as saying “I do”.