Centennial Event

By the early 1900′s one man’s vision began the transformation of the Humber Valley forever. Robert Home Smith, financier, railway builder, real estate developer and avid sportsman purchased 3,000 acres in the Humber Valley, from Lake Ontario to what was to become Eglinton Avenue. His concept was to develop a unique modern community.

The Old Mill Tea Garden acted as the community centre for the residents of this new residential development, a place where news and events of the day were exchanged. Home Smith’s motto “A LITTLE BIT OF ENGLAND FAR FROM ENGLAND” epitomized his objective to create a Toronto suburb of grace and tranquility through English Tudor architecture.  

In 1991 George and Michael Kalmar restored and reconstructed the original grist mill and opened the Old Mill Hotel on October 2001, featuring 57 luxurious appointed rooms and suites, a full service spa and an English style bar dedicated to Robert Home Smith.

On September 18, 2014, one hundred years following Robert Home Smith’s vision, the Old Mill Toronto celebrated their Centennial Anniversary with an opulent Event.

So begins the new chapter in shaping the history of the Old Mill.

The Red carpet was rolled out in anticipation of our guests arrival.

The Paparazzi were feverishly waiting to snap away at our honoured guests.

Everyone was smiling on the Red carpet!

Our “TIFF” board was a hit with all of our guests posing for the cameras!

Stilt walkers, mimes, contortionists, magicians, balloon sculptors and jugglers were all on-site to entertain everyone with their talents.

  

The Executive Chef Martin Buehner and his culinary team went over the top to impress and tantalize our tastebuds with Italian flare, Sushi Bars, Seafood Stations, Ultimate Patio BBQ, Gourmet Grill Cheese, decadent desserts and much much more, oh and of course one can’t forget the ultimate liquid nitrogen Ice Cream stand!

Our flower shop team of designers were responsible for the decor, which was spectacular!

Of course the night was not complete until we sang Happy Birthday to the Old Mill…you don’t turn 100 everyday!

Thank you to all of our guests and to our partners, AV Canada, Trius Wines, Belvedere Vodka, Mill Street Brewery and Ken Shaw Lexus for celebrating our Centennial in style.

 More Photos can be viewed on our Facebook page

 



A Salute to Big Bands

 

big band is a type of musical ensemble that originated in the United States and is associated with jazz and the Swing Era typically consisting of rhythm, brass, and woodwind instruments totalling approximately 12 to 25 musicians. Whew, glad we got that sorted out of the way.

Jazz began in New Orleans in the early 1900′s. Steamboats using the Mississippi helped spread the sound of jazz as many of the New Orleans jazz bands performed as entertainment on the boats. In the 1920′s, the music of jazz began developing into a big band format combining elements of ragtime, black spirituals, blues, and European music. Some of the more popular early big bands included band members that would become future jazz stars and future big bandleaders such as Coleman Hawkins, Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Red Allen, Roy Eldridge, Benny Carter, and John Kirby.

When the depression hit the U.S. in 1929 the entire music business suddenly failed. The decline in record sales, coupled with the closure of speakeasies and jazz clubs after the repeal of Prohibition in 1933, forced many jazz musicians to move to New York or other highly populated cities and seek work at dancing venues in large ballrooms. Swing bands played a large part in people’s lives in the late 30′s as people tried to shake off the depression by dancing and while records and radio made swing music widely available, this mediated music soon inspired fans’ the desire to experience their favorite swing live.  

Big Bands still hold a special place in the hearts of many as it is a positive and optimistic music and an inspiration during one of the more difficult periods of American History. No person living at the time was not touched in some deep way by it as it helped guide them through the Great Depression, World War II and the post-war recession.  Swing music fulfilled the yearning for a sentimental, romantic escape from the mundane and at the same time was appreciated for its excitement and even as fine art. 

Today more than fifty years later the sounds of swing band music can be heard and one of the most exciting big bands is The Toronto All-Star Big Band. They revive the spirit, style and sound of 1930s and ’40s and are performing at the Old Mill Toronto Dance Hall with tributes to  Glen Miller on September 7th, Benny Goodman on October 5th, and Tommy Dorsey on November 23rd.

Remember, It Don’t Mean a Thing, If It Ain’t Got That Swing”!